Zukic family tragedy

Image: Sehija and Dzemal Zukic

Image: Vildana(Dzemal) Zukic and her grandmother Sevala Kustura

Image: Alen(Dzemal) Zukic

The Zukic family lived in Slavisa Vajnera Cice street in Visegrad. Dzemal Zukic was murdered on a bridge near the ”Terpentin” firm along with several other Bosniaks. Soon afterwards, the remaining Zukic family: Dzemal’s wife Sehija, their daughter Vildana(1986) and new-born son Alen(1991) along with Sehija’s mother Sevala Kustura, were brutally murdered. According to some witnesses, these murders were carried out by Dragana Djeric-Cerovic, a former employee of ”Terpentin”.  Some reports have indicated that the murder of these children is being investigated by the B&H state police SIPA.

Dragana was also investigated in relation to heroin production(using acetic anhydride ) in Terpentina while she was the director of the firm. According to news reports, the heroin produced was used to finance the hiding of Radovan Karadzic.

In the meanwhile,  in February 2010, Dragana has been named as judge in Velika Kladusa municipality court.

Edit: 11.05.2010

6 Responses to “Zukic family tragedy”

  1. You don’t mention other elements of Dragana Djeric-Cerovic’s background.

    The SFOR Main News Summary for 30 January 2004 carries the following item:

    Acetic acid was used for the production of heroin to finance the hiding of Radovan Karadzic!

    The recent arrest of Bogdan Vasic, SDS businessman, on suspicion that he was importing acetic acid to produce heroin, and the hysterical reaction by Zoran Djeric, RS Minister of Internal Affairs, several days ago in the RS National Assembly to the reporting of Nezavisne Novine about this case suggest that this heroin case is one of the biggest scandals in the RS in the past several months. Slobodna Bosna has discovered a series of new sensational details of this scandal that suggest that this is a state crime on a large scale. Slobodna Bosna has also reported that the main protagonists of the acetic acid scandal are related to or friends with Mirko Sarovic, Zoran Djeric and the Director of the RS Police Administration, Radomir Njegus. During the first days of an investigation of Vasic, Zoran Djeric intervened with the Visegrad police to release Vasic from custody because Mirko Sarovic, SDS Vice President, had asked him for this favor. This is perhaps exactly the reason why this case was transferred to the BiH Court several days later. Among those responsible is the Director of the Terpentin factory, Dragana Djeric-Cerovic, who is a close relative of the RS Police Minister, Zoran Djeric. She denied that heroin was produced in this factory. To recall, Bogdan Vasic was close to the SDS for years, and especially to its Vice President, Mirko Sarovic, and his main member, Milovan Cicko Bjelica. During the pre-election campaign in 2000, Vasic was raising donated funds for the SDS, and managed to collect about KM 300,000 in eastern RS, while donors received promises from Mirko Sarovic, former candidate for the RS President, that they would be appointed to the positions they deserved in Termoelektrana in Gacko. (Photo on page 22)

    Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be any further information available from English language sources about the case.

  2. I omitted SFOR’s source reference for the information about Dragana Djeric-Cerovic, which was Slobodna Bosna (undated).

  3. Is Dragana Djeric-Cerovic in fact related to Zoran Djeric, the Republika Srpska Minister of Internal Affairs? Has the Office of the High Representative had any comment to make about the appointment of Dragana Djeric-Cerovic as a judge in the circumstances reported?

  4. visegrad92 Says:

    Owen, thanks.
    Dragana and Zoran Djeric are very close relatives. That is why no one from this heroin scandal has been prosecuted.

    The heroin scandal is most probably related to Milan Lukic and the murder of his brother Novica:
    http://www.iwpr.net/report-news/bosnia-serb-police-target-karadzic-informer

    Concerning OHR, they have stopped paying attention to justice a long time ago.

  5. András Says:

    A small technical correction.

    Acetic acid is not hard to find or expensive — it’s the active ingredient in common vinegar, which one can easily buy at the grocers. But note that acetic acid as such cannot be used to turn morphine base into heroin.

    The reagent used for converting morphine base into heroin is called acetic anhydride, a chemical widely used in organic synthesis. Although it’s possible to prepare acetic anhydride from acetic acid by a chemical process, due to its low cost acetic anhydride is usually purchased in bulk, not prepared, for use in laboratories and chemical plants.

    My guess is that Dragana Djeric-Cerovic, through her connection with the “Terpentina” plant, had access to a supply of acetic anhydride (not acetic acid).

  6. Abdulmajid Says:

    I fear that someday this absence of justice will lead to acts of revenge someday, for “when justice is denied, avengers are born.” Notthat I have any sympathy withthose people if teh evil they unleashed comes back to haunt them.
    But how can that person be appointed judge in a part of the country that does not belong to “RS”? Or ist it because Velika Kladusa (near Bihac) is still the stronghold of the followers of renegade and traitor Fikret Abdic? Shouldn’t they be outlawed? The Abdicevci sold or gave all Bosniaks who opposed Fikret Abdic to the Serbs to mistreat or execute, according to the account of one girl who survived (and was so mistreated she’d have good reason to envy those who were killed. She wrote under the pseudonym “Lejla”)
    And I see the Bosniaks will have a very tough job putting order in “their” part of the country before they can even think of taking on the Serbs. And, yes, I want to do something constructive to that end – but whom can I trust? There was more than a handful of traitors among the Bosniaks. Who knows how many of these traitors are now in high position and would stab their own people in the back again?

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