Archive for September, 2010

Jelena Rasic – initial appearance

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on September 22, 2010 by visegrad92

Jelena Rasic is seen during her initial appearance in the courtroom of the Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague September 22, 2010. Rasic, former legal case manager for a Bosnian Serb convicted of mass murder, pleaded not guilty Wednesday to contempt-of-court charges for allegedly paying three witnesses to provide false testimony. Rasic is accused of handing over 1,000 Euro ($1337) each to three men whose testimony was intended to clear Milan Lukic of involvement in the murder of a group of Muslim men summarily executed in June 1992, and faces a maximum sentence of seven years imprisonment if convicted of the five counts.

Advertisements

Lawyer Jelena Rasic at The Hague

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on September 21, 2010 by visegrad92

National Council for Cooperation with the Hague Tribunal President Rasim Ljajić.

He said that lawyer Jelena Rašić has been handed over to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (Hague) for bribing witnesses to testify in favor of Hague indictee Milan Lukić, said Ljajić.

“The proceedings against Rašić were completed last week, she did not appeal and today she was transferred to the Hague tribunal,” said Ljajić.

Source: B92

Related:

+ Zuhdija Tabakovic pleads guilty

+ Serbian criminals offered monetary incentives for false testimonies


Dirty War of ‘Ethnic Cleansing’

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on September 20, 2010 by visegrad92

Los Angeles Times

August 10, 1992 |

By CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER

Column One

Dirty War of ‘Ethnic Cleansing’

Muslim Slavs have been robbed, beaten, thrown out of their homes and imprisoned by Serbian militiamen. Their accounts suggest a clear pattern of persecution.

August 10, 1992|CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER

ZAGREB, Croatia — While visiting his son in Visegrad in eastern Bosnia earlier this summer, Delic Suljo, a 65-year-old retired factory worker from Gorazde, learned what the twisted term “ethnic cleansing” has come to mean to some here.

Suljo’s story isn’t easy to hear. It provides a glimpse, however, into how some have carried out the terror, thuggery, theft and murder that have engulfed the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina and made an estimated 2.2 million citizens of the former federation refugees.

Both sides in the Yugoslav civil war–Croats and Serbs–have been accused of committing atrocities as they have tried to capture and control disputed territory, much of it–especially in Bosnia-Herzegovina–in areas where Muslims, Croats and Serbs long have lived together in harmony.

But world attention has been riveted in recent days by new allegations of Serbian brutality–ugly conduct that has been likened by some to Nazi-era horrors and chillingly linked by statements of some Serbian leaders about what they call “ethnic cleansing,” the removal of non-Serbs from areas claimed by Serbs.

This process began in Visegrad, said Suljo and Vanica Basija, 68, a Visegrad resident, when Serbian militiamen moved in a day after the former Yugoslav National Army stopped shelling the town. The soldiers drove through Visegrad with loudspeakers mounted on trucks, urging citizens, “Remain loyal!”–to what was not made clear–and “Do your work and you will not be harmed!”

The militiamen, Suljo said, then moved through the city, street by street, with lists of residents on which Muslim names were readily identifiable. When the Muslims–or, in some cases, Croats–were not identified or listed on the post office register, simple terror could be used to induce some Serbian residents of Visegrad to identify their Muslim neighbors.

Sometimes, according to Suljo and other refugees, the Serbian neighbors were willing accomplices. But in some cases, the Serbian neighbors–among whom they have lived all their lives–were horror-stricken and did what they could to help.

From the upper floor of his son’s house, Suljo said he watched from May 12 to June 15 as Serbian militiamen murdered scores of unarmed civilians on the bridges at either end of the town’s main street. They heaved the bodies into the river, he said.

On June 16, the Serbs, with their lists, came to Suljo’s street.

“They called everyone out from the houses,” he said. “They told us to wait until they brought the truck. But I had already seen where the truck went, and we got very scared. And 11 of us tried to get to the Red Cross. As we were going, two (Serbian guerrillas) came from behind us and stopped us. At that moment, we were 40 yards from the old bridge. . . . And then we heard a car stop, and someone in the car, another (soldier), yelled at them to leave us alone. They had an argument. One in the car said, ‘Let them go; they are too old.’

“Then the two of them marched us to a nearby schoolyard,” Suljo said, “and started to interrogate us about our sons and daughters. . . . When I said I was from Gorazde, one of them hit me with a clenched fist to the nose. Then my nose started to bleed. And then they kicked me with their boots and broke three of my ribs. . . .

“They ordered me and one other older man to go in front of them,” he recalled. “And I thought for sure they were going to kill us on the bridge. We were walking in front of the hotel where most of the (militiamen) were sleeping. There was a body there, in the street, of a man whose head was almost destroyed. . . . (A soldier) ordered us to drag him to the bridge. We dragged the body, by the legs, to the bridge, and they ordered us to throw him over.

“When we came on the bridge,” he said, “we saw a brain, a human brain. . . . The (soldier) made the other man pick it up and throw it in the river. . . . There were two more bodies on the bridge, men whose throats had been cut. He ordered us to throw these two bodies into the river.

“As I was in poor condition, with my ribs broken, and the other man very old, it was very hard to do, and he kicked us a few times,” he said. “So we managed to throw these two bodies, as well. When we finished, we were covered in blood, all my clothes soaked in blood, head to foot.”

In an evident act of leniency for their labor, the militiamen spared Suljo and his companion that day. The next morning, he managed to flee to the town’s Red Cross office, where local people–Serbs, Suljo hastened to point out–helped to get him out of town, to relative safety. “You ask why they are doing this,” Suljo said of his bloody ordeal at the hands of the militiamen. “They are doing it because we are Muslims.”

Editor’s Note: Only part I of Mr. Power’s article was re-published on Visegrad Genocide Memories – the part dealing with Visegrad. The complete article can be found here.

Perucac lake 19.09.2010

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , on September 20, 2010 by visegrad92

On 19.09.2010 a large group of volunteers arrived to Perucac lake to help in digging the ground in search of genocide victims from Visegrad. They worked in front of a restaurant –  a popular tourist site  – where a large number of bones were found. Most skeletons found in Perucac are incomplete because the bodies decomposed in the Drina River –  shattering remains of one body on a large area.

Many victims of the Visegrad Genocide will never be found  but during this action at least some families will find their loved ones.

Exhumations and the search for victims remains will continue for the next couple of days until the Perucac lake is refilled totally. Serbia has ignored calls from Bosnia to delay filling the lake.

Image: Volunteers digging the soil in search of Visegrad Genocide victims. (Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Image: Volunteers digging the soil in search of Visegrad Genocide victims. (Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Image: Yellow flags indicate a place where a human remain was found. This site is in front of a restaurant – a popular tourist site on Perucac lake.(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Image: Volunteers digging the soil in search of Visegrad Genocide victims. (Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Image: Volunteers digging the soil in search of Visegrad Genocide victims. (Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Image: Volunteers were transported to Perucac lake from Omeragici village in army trucks provided by BH Armed Forces(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Image: Volunteers were transported to Perucac lake from Omeragici village in army trucks provided by BH Armed Forces(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Image: Volunteers were transported to Perucac lake from Omeragici village in army trucks provided by BH Armed Forces(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic)

Perucac exhumations 10.09.2010

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on September 13, 2010 by visegrad92

On 10.09.2010, the second day of Eid,more than a hundred volunteers from Sarajevo made their way to Perucac lake where hundreds of remains of Bosniak victims from Visegrad lay. They were murdered by Bosnian Serb forces in 1992 and their bodies dumped into the River Drina. The following pictures were taken by Velija Hasanbegovic, a Visegrad genocide survivor and one of the organizers of  the exhumations.

Image: Volunteers make their way towards a exhumation site.

Image:Volunteers make their way towards a exhumation site.

Image: A volunteer digging the soil in search of bones.

Image: Volunteers digging the soil in search of bones.

Image: Volunteers digging the soil in search of bones.

Image: Velija Hasanbegovic (first from left) with a group of volunteers helping with the exhumations.

Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic ©

Perucac exhumations – Part 1

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on September 11, 2010 by visegrad92

Image: Large areas of the Drina River banks are being dug up in search of Bosniak victim remains.(Photo credits: Berina Pekmezovic)

Image: Volunteers dig through the soil looking for remains.(Photo credits: Berina Pekmezovic)

Image: Over 150 volunteers from Sarajevo came to Perucac lake on the second day of Eid to help with the search for victim remains.(Photo credits: Berina Pekmezovic)

Image: Survivors of the Visegrad genocide and organizers of searches for victim remains in the Drina River : Velija Hasanbegovic, a photographer and Hida Kasapovic, President of the “Visegrad 92 “Association. For over a month, Velija and Hida have been traveling to Drina almost everyday, helping investigators in their work. (Photo credits: Berina Pekmezovic)

Exhumations at Perucac lake

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on September 6, 2010 by visegrad92

Perucac lake, a very popular tourist destination for Serbian and foreign tourists has been a large exhumation site in the last month. Over a hundred remains of Bosniak victims from Visegrad have been found. All of them were murdered by Bosnian Serb forces in 1992 and their bodies dumped into the Drina River.

Image: Teeth and a comb of a Bosniak victim found at Perucac lake.(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic©)

Image: Bones of a Bosniak victim found at Perucac lake.(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic©)

Image: Remains of a victim’s jaw found at Perucac lake.(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic©)

Image: A volunteer helping investigators find remains of genocide victims.(Photo credits: Velija Hasanbegovic©)

Image: A plastic bag found on Perucac lake containing bones of a baby along with a child’s comb. ( Photo credits: Hida Kasapovic)

Image: A rope used to tie victim’s hands and a watch found on Perucac lake.( Photo credits: Hida Kasapovic)

Image: A victim’s notebook and a hamajlija (amulet) found in Perucac lake. (Photo credits: Hida Kasapovic)

Image: A victim’s remains along with clothing and boots found on Perucac lake.( Photo credits: Hida Kasapovic)