Archive for mitar vasiljevic

Slap memorial for Visegrad genocide victims

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 15, 2009 by visegrad92

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Image: Slap near Zepa were bodies of genocide victims from Visegrad were retrieved and buried by local Bosniaks. In 1992 Bosniaks in Visegrad were murdered on the Mehmed-pasa Sokolovic Bridge and on the New Bridge. Their bodies dumped into the Drina river. Read more here.

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Image: Slap near Zepa were bodies of genocide victims from Visegrad were retrieved and buried by local Bosniaks. In 1992 Bosniaks in Visegrad were murdered on the Mehmed-pasa Sokolovic Bridge and on the New Bridge. Their bodies dumped into the Drina river. Read more here.

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Image: The Drina river, the largest gravesite of Bosniaks from Eastern Bosnia.

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Image: Slap near Zepa were bodies of genocide victims from Visegrad were retrieved and buried by local Bosniaks. In 1992 Bosniaks in Visegrad were murdered on the Mehmed-pasa Sokolovic Bridge and on the New Bridge. Their bodies dumped into the Drina river. Read more here.

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Image: Slap near Zepa were bodies of genocide victims from Visegrad were retrieved and buried by local Bosniaks. In 1992 Bosniaks in Visegrad were murdered on the Mehmed-pasa Sokolovic Bridge and on the New Bridge. Their bodies dumped into the Drina river. Read more here.

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Image: Slap memorial for Visegrad genocide victims.

Note: We thank Mevludin Agic for allowing us to use these pictures.

Video of Slap exhumation:

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Serbia involved in war crimes in Visegrad

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2009 by visegrad92

Natasa Kandic, the director of  “Fond for Humanitarian Law” in Belgrade gave a short interview to E-novine, (an online magazine) journalist Bojan Tončić. We have translated the most interesting parts. Read full article here.

Natasa Kandic. Photo by Dragan Kujundžić

Natasa Kandic. Photo by Dragan Kujundžić

All the officers who were in the Visegrad Brigade are pensioned here or are still in the Serbian Army. And the same thing is always repeated: Serbia did not take part in the war, but their officers did and their citizens did.

”It is very important that Milan and Sredoje Lukic were not indicted for command responsibility, they were the direct perpetrators of the most hideous war crimes”, says Natasa Kandic.

”Along with Milan Lukic were many other individuals, even women; sometimes he was a Serb, but when he was to be freed from jail in Belgrade then he was a citizen of another country. During the trial for  crimes committed  against Muslims from Sjeverin, we got a confirmation document that he was a member of the Republika Srpska Army. So he did not commit crimes that were not known of, Republika Srpska and Serbian authorities were fully aware of them. Every week he was in Belgrade, nobody had the intention to arrest him, because it was part of the strategy to full fill an aim with deportations and murders – the creation of  a Serb state.  So, Serbia is involved because all the officers who were in the Visegrad Brigade are pensioned here or are still in the Serbian Army. And the same thing is always repeated: Serbia did not part part in the war, but their officers did and their citizens did. And the officers and policemen who were present there,  refused to help those who survived the live pyres. In that police they were surely people from Serbia”, says Natasa Kandic.

A women from Zvornik who testified against Lukic, a protected witness, said that she was “unfortunately Serb”. “She said that one day she saw Milan Lukic and another man who represented himself as a student from Novi Sad, cutting a man with knifes. She saw Milan Lukic, leading armed children when he and Mitar Vasiljevic murdered Medo Mulahasic on the Drina Bridge, and teaching children how to shoot before that” , says Natasa Kandic


Bikavac live pyre 27.06.1992-27.06.2009

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2009 by visegrad92

On 27.06.1992, one day before the famous Serb Holiday “Vidovdan” around 70 Bosniak civilians mostly women and children were forced into the house of Meho and Dervisa Aljic in Bikavac settlement, stripped of their jewelry, barricaded and set on fire by Bosnian Serb soldiers gathered around the unit “Avengers” commanded by Milan Lukic . The only person who survived was Zehra Turjacanin. This year for the first time, this massacre was marked by victim families.

The site were Meho Aljic's house used to stand.

The site were Meho Aljic's house used to stand.Copyright by Dnevni Avaz.

This piece of fence is the only thing left which remainds people of Meho and Dervisa Aljic’s house.

Esad Tufekcic's wife and two underaged children were burnt alive that night on Bikavac by Bosnian Serb soldiers.

Esad Tufekcic's wife and two underaged children were burnt alive that night on Bikavac by Bosnian Serb soldiers.

Esad Tufekcic’s wife Dzehva(28 years old), daughter Elma (5 years old) and son Ensar (1.5 years old) were burnt alive that night on Bikavac hill.

The site were Meho Aljic's house used to stand and Mujesira Memisevic, a person who witnessed the crime from nearby.

The site were Meho Aljic's house used to stand and Mujesira Memisevic, a person who witnessed the crime from nearby.Video footage by FTV.

After the crime was committed the house was destroyed by Bosnian Serb soldiers. One piece of fence is the only thing that today remains of Meho Aljic’s house. Mujesira Memisevic, like many others, watched the house in flames, listened to the cries of women and children. She later on visited the crime scene and witnessed burnt body parts.

Meho and Dervisa Aljic, the owners of the house were the crime was committed.

Meho and Dervisa Aljic, the owners of the house were the crime was committed.Video footage by TVSA.

The owners of the house were not in Visegrad when the crime was committed, they were shocked to hear their house mentioned on the news. It is still very hard for them to visit their property.

Serb neighbours nearby claim that they do not know anything about what happened on Bikavac that 27 June 1992. They refuse to tell victim families where the remains of the victims are.

NEVER FORGET BIKAVAC!

Read more on this caseMilan&Sredoje Lukic Indicment ; Lukic’s laywers try to bribe victims ; Prosecution Accuses Lukic Witness of Perjury


NEVER FORGET VISEGRAD GENOCIDE

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 12, 2009 by visegrad92

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The man who burned children

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on February 27, 2009 by visegrad92

Serb War Criminal Mitar Vasiljevic. Commited Crimes Against Bosniak Muslims in Visegrad.

But it was in the south-eastern city of Visegrad one year earlier, say prosecutors, that a different ethnic campaign was maybe even more successful. In Courtroom Two, Bosnian Serb Mitar Vasiljevic is being tried for extermination and murdering Muslims while he was a member of the White Eagles paramilitary group. Before the war, over half of Visegrad’s residents were Muslim. After it, there wasn’t a single one left, and prosecutors say that following Srebrenica, Visegrad has the highest number of people who “simply disappeared.” “Mitar Vasiljevic is not the most infamous among the Tribunal’s indictees,” Prosecutor Dermot Groome told the three judges hearing the case. “But he is one who by his own hands committed an act which is perhaps one of the single most horrific and egregious affronts to humanity in the war, to the most innocent of victims.”

Those victims were some 70 Muslims — mostly women and children — who prosecutors say were trying to leave Visegrad. Posing as a Red Cross worker, Vasiljevic is alleged to have led them to a house on Visegrad’s Pioneer Street, where he said they’d be safe. Instead, he and two other men charged with him are said to have burned them alive, shooting at people as they tried to escape through windows. “There was a small baby among them,” said Groome. “She had yet to see her third day on this earth. Anguished cries from the dying echoed … for two hours after the match was first struck.” Five people managed to survive. They will come to The Hague to testify against Vasiljevic, who says he wasn’t there when the fire was set.

There will also be other survivors: two Muslim men who survived a mass execution along the Drina River. One of them, a protected witness, Witness 32, testified Tuesday. The 36-year-old dental technician told how he was one of seven men forced to line up on the banks of the Drina River. Vasiljevic was there with a Kalashnikov automatic weapon. Witness 32 remembers hearing a voice asking whether they were going to “shoot individually or in bursts of gunfire.” The answer, said Witness 32, was individually. He recalled, with his voice choking, the interminable walk down to the river. “These last ten meters of my life I just wanted to spend them with my two-year old daughter. While I was crossing these 10 meters, I didn’t see a thing … I just saw the image of my daughter running into my arms.” He, along with one other, survived by jumping into the river and pretending to be dead. Vasiljevic is charged, in part, with murder as a crime against humanity for being one of the executioners in that massacre.

Visegrad’s mass murderers: Mitar Vasiljevic

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on November 29, 2008 by visegrad92

Mitar VASILJEVIC,
born 25 August 1954 in Durevici, Visegrad municipality, Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Indictment (“Visegrad”)
The initial indictment against Mitar Vasiljevic, Milan Lukic and Sredoje Lukic was confirmed on 26 October 1998. Mitar Vasiljevic was arrested and transferred to the Tribunal on 25 January 2000. On 28 January 2000, he pleaded not guilty to all 14 counts of the indictment.

An amended indictment against Mitar Vasiljević, Milan Lukić and Sredoje Lukić was filed on 12 July 2001 and on 20 July 2001 Judge Hunt orally granted leave to amend the indictment, charging Mitar Vasiljević with ten counts. Although the amended indictment did not alter any factual allegations or legal theories found in the original indictment, in light of new evidence and further investigations, it did withdraw four counts against Mitar Vasiljevic relating to the house burning in Bikavac.

On 24 July 2001, with the two co-accused still at large, the Trial Chamber ordered that Mitar Vasiljevic be tried separately.

Factual allegations:
The Amended Indictment states that Mitar Vasiljevic, a Bosnian Serb, was born 25 August 1954, in the village of Durevici, Visegrad municipality. Before the war, he worked as a waiter at the Hotel Panos in Visegrad. After the war started, Mitar Vasiljevic joined Milan Lukic’s group of paramilitaries.

According to the Amended Indictment, confirmed on 20 July 2001, Milan Lukic formed a group of local paramilitaries referred to often as the “White Eagles” and the “Avengers” in the spring of 1992. This group worked together with local police and Serb military units to inflict a reign of terror on the local Muslim population in the Visegrad muncipality, in the south-east of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Milan Lukic’s cousin Sredoje Lukic was also a member of the group. The group’s criminal activities lasted from April 1992 to October 1994.

The Indictment alleges that sometime during May and July 1992 Mitar Vasiljevic allegedly committed a multitude of crimes including the murder of Bosnian Muslims and other non-Serb civilians, the harassment, humiliation, terrorization psychological abuse, and theft and destruction of personal property of Bosnian Muslims and other non-Serb civilians. In addition the indictments alleges that on or about 7 June 1992, Milan Lukic, Mitar Vasiljevic and other uncharged individuals led seven Bosnian Muslim men to the Drina River and forced them to line up along its bank. Milan Lukic, Mitar Vasiljevic, and others then opened fire and shot at the men with automatic weapons thereby causing the deaths of: Meho Dzafic, Ekrem Dzafic, Hasan Kustura, Hasan Mutapcic and Amir Kurtalic.

Charges:

Mitar Vasiljevic is charged with six counts of crimes against humanity (Article 5 of the Statute – extermination; persecutions on political, racial and religious grounds; murder; inhumane acts) and four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (Article 3 of the Statute – murder; violence to life and person).

Trial
On 24 July 2001, the Trial Chamber ordered that the accused Mitar Vasiljevic be tried separately on the Indictment since the two co-accused were still at large. The trial of Mitar Vasiljevic commenced on 10 September 2001 with the presentation of the Prosecution case-in-chief which concluded on 12 October 2001.The defence case commenced on 23 October 2001 and concluded on 10 January 2001. The closing arguments for both parties took place 6, 8 and 14 March 2002.

Trial Chamber Judgement

On 29 November 2002, the Trial Chamber rendered its Judgement (see Judicial Supplement No. 38). Sentencing Mitar Vasiljevic to 20 years’ imprisonment, the Trial Chamber found that the Accused “incurred individual criminal responsibility for the crime of persecution as a crime against humanity in relation to the murder of five men and the inhumane acts against the two survivors”.
The Trial Chamber acquitted the Accused of the other counts charged against him (i.e. extermination, violence to life and person), the evidences of those charges being considered insufficient.

http://www.un.org/icty/glance/vasiljevic.htm